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What is the Fuse Tester

Author: Apogeeweb
Date: 11 May 2022
 79
circuit tester

Catalog

Introduction

Ⅰ What is a Fuse?

Ⅱ What is the Fuse Tester

Ⅲ Dedicated Fuse Tester

Ⅳ How to Test the Fuse

4.1 How Plug Fuses Work

4.2 Professional Advice for Testing a Fuse

4.3 Replacing a Fuse Can Be Expensive

4.4 Test Your Fuse First to Make Sure It's Blown

4.5 How to Test Cartridge Fuses

4.6 Using a Continuity Tester

4.7 Testing a Fuse With a Multimeter

4.8 How to Use a Voltmeter

Ⅴ Choosing the Correct Fuse For your Tester

5.1 Why does a Tester Need Fuses?

5.2 When does a Fuse Tester Become a Grenade?

5.3 The plasma fireball

5.4 Using the Proper Fuse

Introduction

The fuse tester is appropriate for fixing cars, trucks, SUVs, and motorcycles, among other things. The fuse tester's led light can assist you in determining the condition of a blown fuse. The circuit tester is appropriate for all types of cars, motorcycles, electric vehicles, boat switch panels, and so on. Furthermore, the tester is a useful tool for offering quick and convenient circuit testing. Furthermore, the tester can help you detect the condition of your car's power supplies and conserve fuel. You can use the fuse tester to determine the quality and safety of your vehicle. Meanwhile, the tester has an LED display that detects blown fuses and the accompanying amperage value. 

Furthermore, the tester will save you time and speed up the job by allowing you to determine whether the circuit is broken or damaged. A fuse tester is an automatic circuit protection device used in automobiles, electrical appliances, and other devices. We know that a fuse is designed to open when a certain amount of current is surpassed. This safeguards us against electric shock and fires caused by the overheated wire. Some fuses, however, safeguard us from a much more serious threat.

fuse

 What is a Fuse?

A fuse is essentially a short length of wire enclosed in a specific housing that is meant to burn in half in the event of an electrical overload. All we have to do now is see if the cable is still intact.

Some fuses feature a small window through which the wire can be viewed, although the view is often poor, the wire is frequently quite small, and mistakes are common. A 30-second test is foolproof and will reveal the truth with no room for error.

 What is the Fuse Tester

A fuse tester is nothing more than a gadget that checks for continuity. It could be a multimeter, a continuity tester, or a dedicated fuse tester.

In all circumstances, the goal is to pass a little current through the fuse; if it passes through, the fuse is good. If it does not, the fuse has blown and must be replaced. This indicates that a battery is required to deliver that modest current, and every fuse tester will include one.

If a fuse tester indicates that a fuse is blown, the next step is to inspect the fuse tester. This is achieved by touching the test leads together or, for testers without leads, by passing a piece of metal (wire, coin, dinner spoon, or anything metal) across the probes. If it does not show "good," the battery should be replaced.

How To Use a Fuse Tester Made by EATON

 Dedicated Fuse Tester

In general, these testers will have a light that will illuminate if the fuse is good. There will always be some way to connect a probe of some kind to each fuse contact. When using dedicated testers, always read and follow the manufacturer's instructions because different fuse testers may operate differently.

 How to Test the Fuse

4.1 How Plug Fuses Work

Inside plug fuses is a metal alloy ribbon that conducts the circuit's current. In the event of a short or overload, which causes an excessive current to flow, the ribbon will melt ("blow") and open the circuit. When this occurs, no current can flow through the circuit, and the circuit is unplugged from the power supply. This prevents short circuits and overloads, which can damage electrical wiring and cause house fires.

When a plug fuse bursts due to a circuit overload or short circuit, the metal fuse element inside the view panel is typically seen melted through, or the glass panel is fogged or charred. However, if in doubt, a multimeter can be used to check the fuse.

4.2 Professional Advice for Testing a Fuse

I've had to test a lot of fuses in my nearly 20 years as an electrician. It's a common troubleshooting strategy that helps me avoid simply changing fuses that I'm not certain are blown.

4.3 Replacing a Fuse Can Be Expensive

Most of us have had a blown fuse at some point and simply changed it. Some fuses, however, aren't inexpensive, and if a replacement isn't nearby, a trip to the auto parts or home improvement store is required.

4.4 Test Your Fuse First to Make Sure It's Blown

It's better to test a fuse first to verify if it's genuinely blown before making a special journey to buy and install a new one. Testing a fuse to see if it has blown is a simple task that requires only a few basic items and can save both money and time.

4.5 How to Test Cartridge Fuses

While a few cartridge fuses feature a window on the side through which you may sometimes see if the fuse has blown, this is uncommon. Cartridge fuses almost always need to be tested with a meter to see whether they are good or not.

Although there are hundreds of distinct cartridge fuses, they all have one thing in common: a metal on either end where electrical contact is made with the fuse holder. These metal ends are the contacts; to test the fuse, touch a probe to each end.

The small AGC glass tube fuse frequently used in automobiles is a form of cartridge fuse; larger ones differ chiefly in that they are made of paper or another substance rather than glass. They are tested in the same way that the glass fuse is shown in the photo below.

To the best of the author's knowledge, this article is accurate and true. The content is provided solely for informational or entertainment reasons and is not intended to replace personal counsel or expert assistance in commercial, financial, legal, or technical problems.

4.6 Using a Continuity Tester

Continuity testers will be equipped with two test leads and a tiny light that will illuminate when the leads are touched together. To test a fuse, connect one lead to each of the fuse's electrical contacts; if the light bulb illuminates, the fuse is good.

4.7 Testing a Fuse With a Multimeter

A multimeter, like a continuity tester, has two leads. A multimeter, on the other hand, has numerous settings for measuring amperage, voltage, and resistance in various ranges. Some multimeters are auto-ranging (no need to select a range), while others are digital meters with a needle to display the measurement.

The first step with any multimeter is to set it to measure resistance, or. If multiple ranges are available, select the lowest range (K on the dial signifies thousand, so 2K equals 2000) - usually around 200. Touch one probe to each contact on a fuse and monitor the reading, just like a continuity tester.

An extremely low value of 1 ohm or less indicates that the fuse is good; if it is blown, the reading will be infinite, or the maximum the meter will display. An intermediate measurement of several ohms indicates that you aren't making good contact; wiggle the probes on the fuse contacts or clean them and try again.

4.8 How to Use a Voltmeter

A Voltmeter, as the name suggests, measures voltage. Some types, known as multimeters, can also measure ohms and amperage. Analog and digital meters are both accessible.

Step 1 Insert the probes into the meter. Red represents the positive (+) and black represents the negative (-).
Step 2 Turn the selector dial or switch to the desired measurement type. Use DCV to measure direct current, such as in a battery. ACV is used to measure alternating current, such as that found in a wall outlet.
Step 3 Select a range setting. Options on the dial may range from 5 to 1000 on the DCV side and 10 to 1000 on the ACV side. The setting should be set to the maximum voltage reading. This option is not available on all voltmeters.
Step 4 Turn the meter on.
Step 5 Touch the red probe to the positive side of a DC circuit or either side of an AC circuit while holding the probes by the insulated handles. Use the black probe to touch the other side.
Step 6 Read the digital display or analog dial.

 Choosing the Correct Fuse For your Tester

5.1 Why does a Tester Need Fuses?

On the market, fuse testers range from simple voltage detectors to highly sophisticated digital multimeters.

Voltage testers contain a high input impedance, which makes an overcurrent condition uncommon. As a result, voltage measurement inputs are typically constructed with overvoltage protection rather than fuse protection. However, if the same tester is intended to measure current as well, fusing is required.Inputs for measuring current typically use a simple shunt through which the measured current flows. The resistance of this shunt is on the order of 0.01 ohms. Add the resistance of the test leads (about 0.04 ohms) and you have a short of less than 0.1 ohms. When you connect this short in series with another load to evaluate the circuit's current, this resistance is adequate. It's a different situation when you connect this circuit to a voltage source, such as the plug outlet in your living room. This is a common error made by persons who measure both voltage and current. After measuring current with the test leads in the current input jacks, the user attempts to measure voltage while forgetting the leads are in the amps jacks. This creates a short across the voltage source. This error nearly damaged the meter movement (the needle wrapped around the top peg) and the internal circuitry years ago, when analog meters were the primary instrument for making these measurements. To prevent this typical occurrence, meter manufacturers began connecting a fuse to the meter's test lead jacks, providing an inexpensive and effective remedy to a relatively basic error. The majority of manufacturers still design their testers with fuse protection in the current measuring circuits nowadays. The science of fuse design has advanced alongside technological advancement. Although people who create testers understand the entire implications of fusing, most tester users do not. When you make the easy error of putting voltage across the current jacks and blowing the fuse, you're initially relieved that you didn't destroy the meter. However, you may become irritated if you have to look for a new fuse and change it before taking your next current measurement. Even more aggravating is when you share meters with other individuals in your shop and someone else blows a fuse and puts the meter away, only for an unwary user to discover the problem.

5.2 When does a Fuse Tester Become a Grenade?

Manufacturers specify the appropriate amperage, interrupt, and voltage ratings for replacement fuses in manuals and, in certain cases, on the meter. If you choose a fuse without these ratings, or worse, wrap a wire around the fuse connections, you have just made a thermal hand bomb. It only takes the correct conditions to set it off. Working on a printer, computer, copier, or other pieces of equipment with its power source is unlikely to result in an explosion (CAT I). You could even work on branch circuits (CAT II) without setting it off. These two environments utilize relatively little energy and frequently include fuse protection, circuit breakers, and over-current protection circuits. However, this is neither a good idea nor a safe manner of working. The protective circuits vary dramatically when you move to an electrical distribution cabinet (CAT III) or principal feed-lines (CAT IV). Instead of the 15, 20, or 30 amp breaker on a branch circuit, the distribution panel has breakers rated at hundreds of amps between you and the power provider. The protection is now at the utility pole or substation when measuring the voltage on the input side of a breaker panel at a dwelling. These breakers can handle thousands of amps before opening and take much longer than a branch circuit breaker to open. As a result, if you leave the leads in the amps jacks and connect the meter leads to one of these voltage sources without using a properly fused tester, your life is at great risk.

5.3 The plasma fireball

The test leads and the short represented by the faulty fuse (or the wire wrapped around the fuse connections) are fed by an almost infinite amount of energy in this condition. The fuse's metal element (or wire) warms up quickly and begins to evaporate, causing a small explosion. The fuse enclosure may break open as a result of the intensity of the explosion, allowing a limitless amount of oxygen to feed a plasma flame.

The test leads may also begin to melt, causing molten metal to splash across your hands, arms, face, and clothing. The severity of your injuries will be determined by how long the energy is delivered to the tester, the amount of oxygen available, and the presence of safety equipment such as face shields and heavy gloves. This everything happens in milliseconds, leaving very little time to correct the error. You might be thrown free of the leads or fuse tester and therefore break the circuit if you're lucky. But luck isn't much of a factor, especially since the situation might have been avoided entirely if the right fuse had been used.

5.4 Using the Proper Fuse

Specially engineered "high-energy" fuses are designed to contain the energy created by an electrical short within the fuse enclosure, preventing electric shock and burns to the user. The length of time the energy is applied and the amount of oxygen available for burning are both limited by these high-energy fuses. Fuses can be engineered to open not just at a constant current but also a high current in an instant. "Minimum interrupt current" is the name given to this high current. 

Fluke's testers use fuses with minimum interrupt ratings of 10,000 and 17,000 amps. The series resistance of roughly 0.1 ohms (0.01 for the shunt, 0.04 for the test leads, and 0.05 for the fuse and circuit board wires) exists between the leads of a CAT III 1000 V meter with the test leads in the amps jacks. Now, if you inadvertently connect the leads to a 1,000-volt source, you'll get a current of 10,000 amps (E/R=I, 1,000/0.1 = 10,000) thanks to Ohms Law. You'll need a fuse tester that can swiftly break that current.

The high-energy fuse is packed with sand in addition to the specifically constructed fuse element. The sand will not only absorb the shock energy caused by the explosive element, but it will also melt and convert to glass due to the high temperatures (up to 10,000 °F) generated by the energy. By blocking off the available oxygen, the glass coats the element and smooths the fireball, keeping you and the tester safe. As you can see, fuses with the same amperage and voltage rating are not all created equal.

 Make sure the fuses you use are the ones the engineer designed into the tester for your safety. To verify you have the correct fuse, always consult the tester's handbook or contact the manufacturer. Replacement fuses for Fluke testers may always be obtained by ordering the part number stated in the tester's handbook. Your safety is far more valuable than the cost of the right fuse for which the fuse tester was built.

 

 

 

 

 

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